Milkman Sound One Watt

Hiding somewhere in the hills of San Francisco is a man in love with Country music and steel guitars - which means he's in love with vintage Fender amplifiers. His name is Tim Marcus, and he grew up on a dairy. It's the family business, so after a lifetime of milking cows and playing guitar, it only made sense to name his amplifiers after his love of milk cows... I might be stretching that a bit. If his experience on farms is anything like mine, he'd probably be OK with never seeing another cow. Anyway, paying homage to his family, he created Milkman Sound amps. Warm and full, bright and rich, Milkman Sound amplifiers are known for beautiful vintage tone in an updated, classy package. Tim's amps are stunningly beautiful. The attention to detail is unbelievable, and that shows in every aspect. They are perfect from wiring to fit and finish. Above all else though, they deliver tonally, and the One Watt is no exception.  Tim's take on a Tweed Princeton, the One Watt is actually five watts. I know, I know, it's confusing. It started life as a one watt, but Tim kept tweaking it until he was happy, which was at five watts, apparently. Five loud watts make this thing a tiny pedal platform that delivers a harmonically rich clean tone, with just a touch more warmth and compression that you think about with a Fender Princeton - never "ice picky"; never brittle, but still pristine and sharp. The tone knob allows you dial in a warm dark tone, a unique characteristic for most amps based off of Princetons. Or, you can dial in a bright presence that is very 1950's Fender. I called it a pedal platform because despite its low watts and tiny size, this thing takes pedals like a beast. Never garbled, never flubbing out. Stack those drives and delays on top of each other. Throw a few more on top for good measure; the One Watt can handle it. With plenty of head room, this thing was designed to be driven, and sounds amazing with everything from low gain pedals to buzz saw fuzz. The One Watt is the perfect studio companion and the perfect at home amp, but it also shines anywhere it can be mic'ed.  It's surprisingly loud, and amazingly controllable. It's perfect for the church player, or anyone in a low stage volume setting. While the One Watt is usually sold as a head, Tim built this One Watt combo especially for my Fly Rig Project, putting together an easy-to-fly-with amp and pedalboard - no backline, no shipping, just an easily transportable rig. Tim took his One Watt amp, paired it with a classically voiced 8" Jensen speaker, and gave me an extra line out for an extension cab, in case I need to push a 2x12 or 4x12. Everyone who I have shown this amp to is amazed by how it sounds and performs. At 13 inches tall and 12lbs, I can tell you this combo punches well above its five watt weight class.

Hiding somewhere in the hills of San Francisco is a man in love with Country music and steel guitars - which means he's in love with vintage Fender amplifiers. His name is Tim Marcus, and he grew up on a dairy. It's the family business, so after a lifetime of milking cows and playing guitar, it only made sense to name his amplifiers after his love of milk cows... I might be stretching that a bit. If his experience on farms is anything like mine, he'd probably be OK with never seeing another cow. Anyway, paying homage to his family, he created Milkman Sound amps. Warm and full, bright and rich, Milkman Sound amplifiers are known for beautiful vintage tone in an updated, classy package. Tim's amps are stunningly beautiful. The attention to detail is unbelievable, and that shows in every aspect. They are perfect from wiring to fit and finish. Above all else though, they deliver tonally, and the One Watt is no exception. 

Tim's take on a Tweed Princeton, the One Watt is actually five watts. I know, I know, it's confusing. It started life as a one watt, but Tim kept tweaking it until he was happy, which was at five watts, apparently. Five loud watts make this thing a tiny pedal platform that delivers a harmonically rich clean tone, with just a touch more warmth and compression that you think about with a Fender Princeton - never "ice picky"; never brittle, but still pristine and sharp. The tone knob allows you dial in a warm dark tone, a unique characteristic for most amps based off of Princetons. Or, you can dial in a bright presence that is very 1950's Fender. I called it a pedal platform because despite its low watts and tiny size, this thing takes pedals like a beast. Never garbled, never flubbing out. Stack those drives and delays on top of each other. Throw a few more on top for good measure; the One Watt can handle it. With plenty of head room, this thing was designed to be driven, and sounds amazing with everything from low gain pedals to buzz saw fuzz. The One Watt is the perfect studio companion and the perfect at home amp, but it also shines anywhere it can be mic'ed.  It's surprisingly loud, and amazingly controllable. It's perfect for the church player, or anyone in a low stage volume setting.

While the One Watt is usually sold as a head, Tim built this One Watt combo especially for my Fly Rig Project, putting together an easy-to-fly-with amp and pedalboard - no backline, no shipping, just an easily transportable rig. Tim took his One Watt amp, paired it with a classically voiced 8" Jensen speaker, and gave me an extra line out for an extension cab, in case I need to push a 2x12 or 4x12. Everyone who I have shown this amp to is amazed by how it sounds and performs. At 13 inches tall and 12lbs, I can tell you this combo punches well above its five watt weight class.